365 Things Austin ‘Foodie Podcast’: Eric Silverstein of Peached Tortilla w/ Natalie Paramore

On this month’s foodie podcast, I interview Eric Silverstein of Peached Tortilla, Peached Social House and Bar Peached

Eric was born in Japan and lived there until he was 11, he then moved with his family to Atlanta and wound up going to college and law school in St. Louis. Eric practiced law for a few years before realizing the corporate grind wasn’t for him. After a talk with his then girlfriend, now wife, Eric packed up and headed to Austin to pursue his dream of opening a restaurant. 

Eric quickly learned that opening a restaurant is quite expensive and decided to change course and open a food truck. Peached Tortilla was born in 2011 right here in Austin. Now, Peached Tortilla has a brick and mortar on Burnet Rd. where they still serve Southern comfort food with an Asian twist. Bahn Mi Tacos, Mom’s Toast and Malaysian Laksa Bowls are all staples on the Peached Tortilla menu. 

Photo: c/o Inked Fingers

While Peached Tortilla no longer has a regularly running food truck, you can still find their trucks at catering and special events. With the succes of Peached Tortilla, Eric and his team went on to open Peached Social House, an event space on North Lamar, and Bar Peached on West 6th, a bar focused full-service restaurant. Most recently, Silverstein authored a cookbook and memoir. You can purchase a signed copy here

Photo: c/o Hunter Townsend

Listen to this month’s podcast to hear more about Eric’s journey opening a successful food truck and his business plan for turning a profit during a tough market and eventually opening several concepts. See his recipe for Japanese Street Corn below!

Reprinted with permission from The Peached Tortilla © 2019 Eric Silverstein. Published by Sterling Epicure. Photography by Carli Rene / Inked Fingers.

JAPANESE STREET CORN

Photo: c/o Inked Fingers

Serves 4

Elotes, grilled Mexican street corn, are wildly popular in certain parts of the United States (and, of course, in

Mexico itself). This is my version, bringing Japanese ingredients to the familiar street corn dish.

  • 1⁄4 cup Cotija cheese, grated
  • 4 large ears yellow or white corn, husks removed and cleaned
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1⁄4 cup Kewpie Mayo
  • 1 1⁄2 teaspoons Aonori
  • 1 1⁄2 teaspoons Togarashi
  • 1 cup Bonito Flakes

 

  1. Spread the Cotija over a large plate.
  2. Heat a grill pan over medium heat and brush the corn with the oil (see Note).

Note If you don’t have a grill pan, you can always cook the corn in the oven at 350°F. Just set the corn cobs, with the husks on,

directly on an oven rack and bake them for 25–30 minutes.

  1. When the pan is hot, place the ears of corn in the pan and give the corn nice grill marks.
  2. After 2–3 minutes, when you start to see dark grill marks appear on the corn, rotate the corn. Continue to

rotate the corn until grill marks appear on every side. The corn should take about 8–10 minutes to cook. Once

the corn is done, remove the ears from the pan.

  1. Using an offset spatula or a knife, coat the exterior of each piece of corn with the kewpie mayo.
  2. Once each ear of corn is coated with mayo, roll it in the Cotija.
  3. To finish garnishing the corn, sprinkle the aonori, togarashi, and bonito flakes on top.

A lot of Japanese chefs shave their own bonito, right before service, with a bonito box. These little wooden

boxes can be purchased online and are imported directly from Japan. They function like a mandoline, except

there is only one blade, and the bonito shavings are caught in a drawer that pulls out of the box. Freshly

shaved bonito has a pronounced, fishy flavor that adds an extra layer of umami to dishes. You can also

purchase whole dried bonito online through Amazon or at specialty Asian retailers.