Greg Ackerman - 2/3 - 365 Things to Do in Austin, TX

Greg Ackerman

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When Trump was elected President last November, media members suggested that the coming political storm would generate a mountain of art reflecting the emotional response of the nation to the train wreck that is the Trump Administration. While there has generally been an increase in art that is critical of the current Western political environment, most of the albums in this list of top records made in Austin are simply great recordings for any music fan and don’t necessarily provide social or political commentary. We believe this year’s list of best new music of 2017 has set the bar high for new releases in 2018 from Austin acts. 

Our list may not be the most well-rounded in terms of genres represented but it reflects new, local records we’ve listened to and enjoyed most in 2017. Before we get into it, we would like to remind readers that purchasing local music from independent sellers is always a good idea. If you’re considering purchasing an album, buy directly from the artist if possible. We’ll link to artist pages where you can buy direct if the option is available. Where there is not that option, heading to your local, independently owned record store is a good bet or order from those stores online. Some of our favorite shops include: End of An Ear, Waterloo Records, Breakaway Records, Friends of Sound Records and Exploded Records at Juiceland

Our list is in order of release date. Asking us to order these talented acts from best to last is near impossible. We love all these records and artists. 

In January, top ATX Afrobeat tastemakers, Hard Proof dropped the full-length “Stinger” on Modern Outsider, a local independent label. What that means is if you purchase this record, a bunch of Austinites get paid. It also means you get one of the best Afrobeat-fusion records of the year. Not just in Austin but nationwide. Produced by The Bubble studio owner and producer Chris “Frenchie” Smith (Built to Spill, Meat Puppets, the Toadies, Otis the Destroyer and a ton more local bands), the record is a great listen from front to back. 

It was difficult to choose, but title track, Stinger,  Incendiary and A.R.A,S. stand out on a record that is consistently a great listen. By that we mean not only is the entire record good, but it’s a pleasure to listen to multiple times a week. From the crack horn section of Jason Frey, Derek Phelps and Joe Woullard to the precise beats by drummer Stephen Bidwell and percussionists Tony Congas and Tommy Spanpinato to Joe Sokolik’s driving bass lines and the guitar work of John Branch, Gerrado Larios (now a member of Spoon) and Aaron Sleator these guys are all among the best working musicians in town. With Smith guiding the production ship, the result is an album that could just as well be considered for a Grammy with the proper exposure. 

February brought Austin neo-pyschrock pioneers, The Black Angels‘  first new record in four years to the masses. Entitled “Death Song,” from their Velvet Underground track namesake, “The Black Angels’ Death Song,” this album might be the sole member of this list that addresses the gloom and anxiousness the American public is feeling about the current political and economic status. That feat is remarkable considering the group penned and recorded most of the tracks during the Presidential elections last year. 

Shortly after the album dropped we caught their second Austin City Limits TV taping. The setlist included many of the tracks from the new record. It quickly became apparent The Black Angels made their darkest record to date. It’s also one of their best releases to date. From opening tune, “Currency” which tackles consumerism and despair to  the driving ferocity of “Commanche Moon’s” indictment of native genocide the album presents a bleak commentary. 

Tracks “Medicine” and “Life Song” come closest to appealing to a broader audience. The former nearly a pop song while the latter evokes a psychedelic space fantasy of Bowie’s “Space Oddity.” This is definitely a must-own record for any psych-rock music fan. 

 

There is no working Austin rock band more successful than Spoon. Over 20 years of making relevant, exquisitely written indie-rock songs with the core of Jim Eno and Britt Daniel have produced a body of work that has gotten the highest average Metacritic score of any group in that time span. An impressive feat for a band that has seen it’s roster evolve over the years yet manage to hold onto their musical identity while exploring other genres to incorporate into the raspy vocals and insistent drum beat of Spoon’s founders. 

The release of Hot Thoughts in February and the ensuing world-tour complete with multiple late-night television show and festival appearances has reaffirmed the group’s dominance into the late 2010s. Singles “Can I Sit Next to You” and “Do I Have to Talk You Into It” are instantly recognizable as classic Spoon compositions that somehow delve into what feels like newer musical territory. The former is a crowd-pleaser live while DITTYIT evokes 80s arena ballads while avoiding the cheesy factor that often accompanies such songs. 

The new album and subsequent tour has been an affirmation of Spoon’s continued success. The return to their original indie label, Matador, the renewed energy and superior songwriting have served the band well. The Spoon engine is clicking on all cylinders.  Everyone should own this record. 

Austin glam-pop act Sweet Spirit has enjoyed rapidly rising notoriety not just locally but nationally after three years of constant touring. The April sophomore release of St. Mojo produced by Los Lobos’ Steve Berlin on Nine Mile Records further elevated the group’s status as single, “The Power” enjoyed frequent radio play locally and on listener-supported and college radio nationally. The full force of vocalist Sabrina Ellis’ impact is felt on the record bolstered by catchy riffs penned by Andrew Cashen and backed by a large collection of fine players. 

The bombastic “The Mighty” is another favorite on this record along with garage-rocker “Pamela” and doo-wop ode, “Pretty Baby” which features Cashen taking a turn on lead vocals. 

If Sweet Spirit aren’t a national sensation within a few years, we’re doing something wrong here in the Live Music Capitol, that much is certain. 

If there is a single band we admire most for their work-ethic and commitment to their craft it’s The Octopus Project. The four-piece, electro-pop, indie-rock hybrid consistently puts out great material and April’s Memory Mirror is no exception to that rule. The group’s DIY approach has led to collaborations with former University of Texas film school classmates that won a Sundance Film Festival award for best score, toured the world and even appeared on KLRU documentary show, Arts in Context in the past couple years. Despite forming over 10 years ago, members of the band continue to create all aspects materials including album art, visuals, graphics, lighting and even packing and shipping their vinyl and merchandise. The band really does it all. 

The new record continues the band’s exploration into popular electronic sounds and textures with video-game inspired track, “Brounce” and the proggy, “Gone Wrong.” 

The Octopus Project recently produced a multi-sensory experience featuring 9-channel surround sound, immersive multi-screen visuals, rumble seats, indoor weather effects to promote the new album and complete their supporting tour at the Texas State History Museum to much critical acclaim. 

If you aren’t already swayed, give that album listen and join the cult of The Octopus Project like the rest of us. 


If there’s a dark horse in this list it’s Kay Odyssey‘s What’s A Woman To Do produced by Nada Surf’s Louie Lino. That said, this dreamy, shoegazey, psych-rocker album by an all-girl lineup led by songwriter and front woman Kristina Boswell is a force. We’re huge fans of this quartet of supremely talented women. From Liz Burrito’s stellar guitar work which she modestly describes as “just following what Kristina’s doing.” to Vajaja Vallejo’s furious drums to Boswell’s awkward hipster there’s a whole lot to like about this band and their Spring release. 

Recently the band released a new video to compliment the fantastic, surreal “Mountains In My Step” song, garnering a lot of attention to the clip which features some nudity and oddly compelling visuals that aren’t as sexually suggestive as one might imagine. The echoey guitars and vocal delays draws in the listener. 

The title track is equally appealing, beginning with Boswell’s lone lyrics, launching into shimmery guitars and a steady beat stretching out into a languid pace. We love this record and this band. 

If you want to rock out, there’s none better to help you along than Otis the Destroyer in our opinion. In September the quartet dropped Frenchie Smith-produced,  Keep Bashing after teasing the record with successive single releases, “Van Rosita,” “Cheetah” and “Monster Eater.” 

What we love about founder Taylor Wilkins’ band is the same element that attracted us to his previous incarnation, The Couch. The band just flat out rocks with an intensity and foundation in quality songwriting. Other standout tracks include the furious “Animal” and title track, “Keep Bashing.” 

If you haven’t caught Otis yet, take a listen to this record then plan on getting out to howl at the moon with these guys. They’re that fun to watch. 

 

The vocal gymnastics of Walker Lukens just slightly supersedes the performer’s predilection for humor and theatrics. Perhaps the most surprising Austin release in terms of national reaction, Lukens’ has made a record, Tell It To the Judge that has attracted the attention of NPR, ABC News and Rolling Stone among other esteemed publications. 

Billboard Magazine called the new album genre-busting and perhaps that is the most apt description. Lukens flatly refuses to be categorized into a single bucket, eschewing traditional songwriting forms in favor of vocal effects, distortions and an experimental approach to his music. 

Produced by Spoon’s Jim Eno, the record delves into ambient electronica just as easily as folk, rock and even elements of rap. The singer’s refusal to be pigeon-holed into a definitive style is a big part of his appeal. 

Track “Where is Thunder Road” demonstrates Eno’s influence on the recording while emphasizing synthesizers and a pop influence on “Don’t Wanna Be Lonely (Don’t Wanna Leave You Alone).” 

Black Pistol Fire‘s Deadbeat Graffiti nearly slipped by unnoticed with a late September release date but the hard-charging duo’s fifth record is a dozy. Setting a reckless tone right out of the gate with fuzzy guitar rocker, “Lost Cause” then leading into the incendiary “Last Ride” singer/guitarist Kevin McKeown and drummer Eric Owen demonstrate why The Black Keys and Dan Auerbach have nothing on these Candadian-turned Texans. 

We caught the band headlining the Derby in the City Event back in May and the guys were ready to rock the new tunes long before the new material made it’s way into the public view. The only question now is how long can this talented pair continue to fly just below the radar of popular culture? Their work has made its way into countless video games and television shows. It’s only a matter of time. 

Last week singer-songwriter Nicole Atkins made her first US tour stop in Austin at Antone’s Nightclub. The reinvented legendary blues club was the ideal spot for the chanteuse to umm… reinvent herself as a neo-soul singer in support of her Mowtown-esque new record, Goodnight Rhonda Lee. The first time you hear Atkins sing you know her voice is special. We thought so the first time we caught the singer sporting a moody indie-rock vibe and working out of Brooklyn (she’s from New Jersey). But seeing the woman sing in a format that features her voice was truly special. Folks walking by on Fifth Street heard her singing and impulsively purchased tickets. Yeah, her pipes are truly golden. 

After an impressive two-man performance by The Midnight Stroll, a sober and genial Atkins and her Nashville-based band took the stage and presented songs from all four of her albums. She rolled out new single co-written with Chris Isaac, A Little Crazy early in the set showing off her Patsy Cline chops. The song features her velvety voice like it should. Another stand-out tune was a cover of Bowie’s Heroes. We’ve seen the song played by a number of artists since the legendary rocker’s death but none surpass the emotion lent to it by Atkins. 

The old-school, early 60s vibe of title track to the new record felt like a crowd-pleaser too. A glance around the room revealed a fairly age-diverse crowd of music fans all with big smiles as she worked through the tune with a great band.

We spoke to her guitarist Stephen who mentioned the band had just gotten back to the States after a whirlwind European tour. He said he was happy to be in Austin as he’s from Texas but now works out of Nashville as producer and touring musician. He was excited about the upcoming American leg of the tour despite jet lag and fatigue. It’s that much fun to tour with Atkins according to the affable musician. 

The road ahead looks rosy for Nicole Atkins. The one-time drinker has tamed her demons, gotten married, moved to Nashville and put out a fantastic new record that allows the listener to better hear the amazing talent that lay in her voice. The indie rock recordings she’s made are better than good, she wouldn’t have such a devoted fan base without putting out quality material, but the new direction has given her a fresh stage presence and vitality while Atkins shed’s her bad girl Rhonda Lee persona for a more stabile, happier future. 

Atkins continues her tour in San Francisco, followed by dates in Portland and Seattle.  The nearly non-stop schedule ends in South Carolina next April. 

Tonight is the kickoff party for Saturnalia Festival in Austin. Naturally we were just as curious as you as to what Saturnalia means but the lineup comprised of mostly national and local psych-rock, alternative and world music standouts is worth checking out. We think it’s a cannot miss scenario for local music fans. Austin acts Golden Dawn Arkestra, The Octopus Project, Hard Proof, Christian Bland (The Black Angels), Money Chicha, Annabelle Chairlegs,  Bushwick Bill (The Geto Boys) and Ringo Deathstarr will join out-of-town performers Allah-Las, Crocodiles, Cosmonauts, American Sharks and Sam France (Foxygen) at four locations in Austin. View the entire lineup on the festival site or poster. 

The Electric Church and Hotel Vegas will host pre-parties tonight and December 1 (tomorrow). The actual festival will take place Saturday and Sunday at Webberville Road Baptist Church and the adjacent Sahara Lounge. By the way, Saturnalia is a traditional Roman holiday that celebrates the coming Winter while honoring Saturn. We don’t really need an excuse to enjoy a lineup this good but we’re happy organizers have put in the effort to book the event during a time of year when there’s typically not much going on in the local live music scene. 

The Sahara Lounge and The Electric Church folks have partnered on this event to bring fans this out-of-box, small-format festival lineup oozing with talent. It doesn’t fix the fact that SOS Festival was cancelled last minute but it certainly helps ease the pain. What’s more, the festival has hired light show masters Bob Mustachio (The Black Angels), Esther Wave, Fever Dream, Astral Violet and Weird Destiny to accompany the talent at four locations in Austin over the entire four days of festival performances. 

Food vendors include Eastside Kings, Southside Flying Pizza, Juiceland, Wunder Pilz, Archie Dove BBQ, Pakal, Neon Rainbow and Laced With Romance. There are plenty of trailer and sit-down retaurant options near all four venue sites as well. Check Eater Austin’s East Austin page for dining recommendations. 

Tickets to Saturnalia Festival are still available. The VIP option includes access to a climate-controlled Saturnalia Lounge. Fans have the option to purchase an a four-day or daily wristband. Tickets to individual shows can be purchased “a la carte” directly from venues in advance or at the door.  Grab tickets here


FULL SCHEDULE

Thursday, Nov 30th – The Electric Church


1-Continental Drift

12-Christian Bland and The Revelators
11-The Nymphs
10-Trance Farmers

Friday, Dec 1st – Hotel Vegas

Outside:
7- Peyote Coyote
8- Teevee
9- Ringo Deathstarr
10- Octopus Project 

Inside:
7:30-Count Vaseline
8:30-Lola Tried
9:30-Al Lover
10:30-Hollow Trees
11:30-Think No Think
12:30- Bushwick BIll

DJ SLIMY STEVE

Saturday, December 2nd – Sahara Lounge & Webberville Road Baptist Church

Outside: 
2:30 – Croy and the Boys
3:30 – The Halfways
4:30 – Big Bill 
5:30 – The Sun Machine
6:30 – American Sharks
7:30 – Cosmonauts
8:30- Golden Dawn Arkestra

Inside:

2- The Hermits

3-Rattlesnake Milk
4-Flower Graves
5-Greenbeard
6- Lochness Mobsters
7- Vockah Redu
8- Mafaro Marimba
8:20- Kupira Marimba
9:15- Crucial Prophet
10:15- Money Chicha
12 – Zoumountchi

Sunday, December 3rd – Sahara Lounge & Webberville Road Church

Inside:
2- Lasertusk
3- True Indigo
4- Fogg
5- Billy King and the bad bad bad
6- Whit
7- Glaze

8 – Acid Carousel
9 – The Millbrook Estates
10- Sam France (of Foxygen)
11-Hard Proof

12- Palm Daze
1- Amplified Heat

Outside:
2:30 – Crypt Trip
3:30 – Pearl Earl
4:30 – Sailor Poon
5:30 – Crocodiles
6:30 – Annabelle Chairlegs 
7:30 – Morgan Delt

8:30- Allah-Las

New Jersey songstress, Nicole Atkins returns to Austin Thursday at Antone’s Nightclub in support of her new record, Good Night Rhonda Lee that takes a sharp turn away from her indie-pop sound to a traditional soul recording complete with Fort Worth’s Niles City Sound Team who turned Leon Bridges into an overnight sensation. The Midnight Stroll (Aaron Behrens of Ghostland Observatory) and Thayer Serrano open the show. 

Atkins’ new approach to her music spotlights the singer’s golden pipes which lay somewhat obscured by the indie-rock slant of her last album, 2014’s Slow Phaser. After being married, moving to Nashville (from NYC) and getting sober, Atkins found the material she was writing was deeply personal and introspective. She found the ideal vehicle for those compositions in Soul and R&B. The genres magnify her considerable vocal talent. It doesn’t hurt to have friends like Chris Isaak to lend a hand collaborating on the lead track, A Little Crazy after encouraging her to change her musical style, 

“Atkins, you have a very special thing in your voice that a lot of people can’t or don’t do. You need to stop shying away from that thing and let people hear it.” -Chris Isaak

                                                       

Listeners will identify the song as an instant classic, highlighted by vulnerable lyrics and Atkins’ apologetic tone for revealing the raw emotions swirling around her transition to a sober lifestyle, marriage and a new home. Frankly we’re eagerly anticipating how well the song translates to the Antone’s stage. The legendary Blues emporium is a the ideal spot to introduce a Soul record that takes the listener back to the Motown pop of the 1960s. 

Atkins is doing it right. She hired the hottest soul producers (and musicians) in the country to back her in Joshua Block, Austin Jenkins and Chris Vivion. We suspect her newfound personal clarity will take an already seasoned and entertaining performer with an established, devoted fanbase and transform the singer into the kind of performer that gains new fans who marvel at the intimacy and emotional impact of her shows. Listening to Goodnight Rhonda Lee reveals her potential for greatness. Those may seem like heady words but if you watched Atkins’ Roadies clip above you’ll find it difficult to refute that bold claim. The album title is both a farewell to the singer’s older, self-destructive incarnation and an introduction to her new approach to making music.  

Tickets are still available from the Antone’s website. Grab them before they’re sold-out. This show is one you’re going to be glad you attended. 

Fans of Deer Tick may have not known what to do with the roots rockers’ latest release, companion albums,  Deer Tick Vol 1 & 2. The first is an all acoustic effort and the latter rocks out like 2009’s Born on Flag Day. The band never takes itself too seriously as the album art suggests. Their 2017 issue is no exception. The artwork on the cover of the new records are ketchup and mustard to signal the records go together. Tomorrow evening, the boys from Providence return to the Mohawk to present the new material in the wake of John McCauley’s (lead vocalist and guitarist) sobriety and new family. Always a compelling live act, Deer Tick have clearly transitioned from a party band into something more. 

Expect separate acoustic and electric sets as the albums are presented if you head to this show (and you should). McCauley has lived with inevitable comparisons to Kurt Cobain (he looks like him). He’s even embraced the similarities, playing Nirvana covers under the moniker, Deervana.  The stringy-haired singer tends to look and sound like (raspy voice) a musical train-wreck a la Cobain as well. Knowing he’s sobered up and righted his life leaves us both apprehensive and excited about tomorrow’s show.

McCauley is now married with a child. The new domestic arrangement seems to have tempered the volatile performer. We’re just thankful his relative peace still produces beautiful music as his band transitions from beer-soaked party band into something more substantial. McCauley has always been a good songwriter but his newfound clarity has produced poetic lyrics as in opening track, “Sea of Clouds.”

“Somewhere in a fog/Of a million pleasantries/I kept my secret safe inside,” whines McCauley. 

He reminds listeners although he’s righted his personal life, demons still haunt the singer as he navigates his new life. The tone of the two records is cautiously optimistic, a sea-change from Deer Tick’s previous release, Negativity (2013) that focused on the trials of addiction and hardship. The rest of the songs are a great listen too. If you didn’t click the link to grab some new Deer Tick flavor, we suggest backing up a minute and taking a listen. We’re certain you’ll be glad you did. After all, it is a rare contemporary musical act that knows exactly who they are and seem comfortable with that. Deer Tick’s authenticity is one that has served them well. We’re glad to see McCauley and the rest of the group has kept artistic integrity in place while expanding his musical boundaries. 

Tickets are still available, grab some from the Mohawk website and join in the fun this weekend. 

On Sunday, the All ATX benefit Austin real estate mogul Gary Keller launched returns. This time the venue is Auditorium Shores with a fantastic lineup featuring John Fogerty (Credence Clearwater Revival), Jack Ingram and Austin’s Shakey Graves. Condensed sets by an all-Austin lineup of Fastball, Kelly Willis, My Jerusalem, Peterson Brothers, Night Drive, Eric Tessmer, Jane Ellen Bryant, and Beto and the Fairlanes will take place earlier in the evening. 

The theme, “Back to the Armadillo,” will celebrate the music of the Armadillo World Headquarters with special performances from AWH All Stars Michael Martin Murphey, Gary P. Nunn and more.  Austin artists will perform their take on classic songs from acts who performed at the legendary venue.  A studio album of the featured renditions will be available for purchase at Auditorium Shores on the night of the concert and at Waterloo Records starting October 29.

It’s rather appropriate the Armadillo is being honored as it’s successor, Threadgill’s World Headquarters is on the verge of closing unless an angel investor swoops in and saves the day. Gary Keller, are you reading this? This weekend’s performance is a precursor to a brand-new All ATX Festival to take place next year at Auditorium Shores in conjunction with C3 Presents who owns reservation for the city-owned land next year according to the Austin Chronicle’s Kevin Curtin. The fest will take place the same weekend as the cancelled SOS Festival who previously held the park that weekend when the event was Fun Fun Fun Fest. 

Event proceeds will benefit four of Austin’s most beloved music nonprofit organizations, including Health Alliance for Austin MusiciansSIMS FoundationAustin Music Foundation and Black Fret.  In 2016, the event raised $500,000, which was directed to the charities to focus on artist healthcare and development.  Even better, just like last year’s performance with the Doobie Brothers at ACL Live, tickets to the show offer seated, reserved spots for ticket buyers. Grab tickets from the All ATX website

The first Friday of ACL Festival was bittersweet because it was when we learned Fun Fun Fun Festival offshoot, SOS Festival had been canceled due to a major investor pulling out. Word got around that SOS Festival organizers Graham Williams and Johnny Sarkis went right to work the day they had to throw in the towel rebooking as many previously scheduled bands as possible in downtown Austin clubs November 10-12.

While there’s not actual jousting or axe throwing this year at SOS Fest, booking company, Margin Walker Presents did an admirable job salvaging the mess into an exciting weekend of performances from the likes of The Shins, Grizzly Bear, Japandroids, Washed Out, Cannibal Corpse, Boris and Ariel Pink. For those who don’t mind a drive down I-35, Ministry is slated for The Majestic Theater on Sunday. Not bad for a last-minute bill. 

Our biggest disappointment in the rebooking process was the absence of Austin acts who were on the original festival bill. Margin Walker has begun addressing that issue by announcing Twin Peaks with ATX’s A Giant Dog on November 15 at the Mohawk this week. CAPYAC, an Austin electronic duo and electro-punks Octopus Project were the only acts included in the original rebooking announcement. CAPYAC play Friday at Emo’s with Washed Out. Octopus Project will share the stage with french dance act, Yelle late at the Mohawk on Saturday. We’re hoping more local acts will be confirmed for performances yet to be announced. 

When asked about the potential for additional artists to be added to the schedule Williams had this to say: 

“Maybe a couple small things, but as for the stuff Nov 10-12, those are all the artists that were routed through and we made homes for. everyone else were flying in, so we’re working on other dates to bring them back. Can’t say for sure that all will play, but I do think most will confirm for make up shows.”

That means there’s still hope Margin Walker will bring in the Yeah, Yeah, Yeahs, Iggy Pop and Blood Orange at some point later in the year or early next year. It’s not a full-blown festival but for those who head out to the shows it will be a good time much like last year’s hastily salvaged LEVITATION festival which also rebooked into clubs following the event’s cancellation due to extreme weather. 

Complete schedule: 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10

ACL Live: Grizzly Bear ($45 / $55 mezzanine seats)

Mohawk: Doors 8:00 p.m.: Cannibal Corpse,  Power Trip, Blanck Mass ($25)

Empire Control Room and Garage: Doors 5:30 pm.): Citizen, Hotelier, Sorority Noise, Alex Napping, Great Grandpa, Oso Oso ($23.50)

Emo’s: Doors 7:30 p.m.): Washed Out, CAPYAC ($35)

Cheer Up Charlies: Doors 9:00 p.m.): Lindstrom, Juan Maclean, Cap’n Tits ($25)

The New Movement: Naughty Bits, Sure Thing

 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11

Mohawk (Matinee Show Doors at 3:30 p.m.): The Story So Far, Turnstile, Drug Church ($25)

Mohawk (Late Show | Doors at 9:30 p.m.): Yelle, Octopus Project ($20)

Emo’s (Doors 7:30 p.m.): Japandroids, Cloud Nothings ($32.50)

Cheer Up Charlies (Doors 7:00 p.m.): The Frights, Hockey Dad, Vundabar ($13)

Scoot Inn: Doors 7:00 p.m.): Noname, Arima Ederra ($25)

The New Movement: Sandbox, The Neighborhood: 7 Year Anniversary, Part 2

 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12:

Mohawk (Doors 6:00 p.m.): Boris, Endon, USA/MEXICO ($20)

Empire (Doors 8:00 p.m.): Snow Tha Product, Castro Escobar, AJ Hernz, Kydd Jones & Tank Washington ($20)

Emo’s (Doors 7:00 p.m.): The Shins, Baio, Girlpool ($59.50)

Cheer Up Charlies (Doors 7:00 p.m.): Ariel Pink, Growl, Mild High Club ($25)

Vulcan Gas Company: Doors 8:00 p.m.): Hot Chip (DJ set), Tim Sweeney, Lovefingers, Flying Turns ($25)

Individual tickets can be purchased at the SOS Festival site. Follow SOS Festival and Margin Walker on Twitter to get the latest updates. 

By the time Spoon got on the Stubb’s BBQ Stage last Friday several articles had been published about their show stopping set at Austin City Limits Music Festival the previous weekend. The beloved Austin act reaffirmed their status as Austin’s favorite indie rock band once again. This time is was in a headlining slot at the festival which Spoon hadn’t played yet.  Britt Daniel and company stole the spotlight from headliners Red Hot Chilli Peppers and Chance the Rapper.

Friday evening’s show was more of a celebration of that joyous homecoming with three thousand of their friends on a familiar stage. The tone of the performance was lighter and more relaxed as opposed to the fierceness the band attacked the ACL Fest set with. The music was just as compelling. An expanded 20-song setlist (the same used on this tour) allowed the band to delve into deeper cuts over the 90 minute performance. Beast and Dragon Adored, My Mathematical Mind and Rainy Taxi appeared in the setlist amid fan favorites, I Turn My Camera OnDon’t You Evah, Don’t Make Me a Target and The Underdog

The four-song encore included the title track from this year’s “Hot Thoughts” followed by a a blistering Rent I Pay. Spoon is performing at the top of their game which is no small statement considering Daniel and drummer Jim Eno have been at it 24 years. There’s a sense of renewal in the energy that comes from the group these days. It is as if newish keyboard/guitarists Alex Fischel and Gerardo Larios have changed the group dynamic to the benefit of the band amid a particularly fruitful writing period for Daniel and Eno in the past four years. 

Spoon continue touring through the end of the year with four more U.S. dates left before heading to Europe then swinging back stateside. If you live in one of these cities, do yourself a favor and go experience Spoon at peak performance level. 

 

 

Canadian improvisational jazz quartet BADBADNOTGOOD (BBNG) played perhaps the punkest jazz show this side of Miles Davis telling everyone to shove it. The group from Toronto who close-out the Tito’s Vodka Stage tonight at Austin City Limits Music Festival, sold-out Mohawk Austin for last night’s Late Night Show, drawing a diverse crowd that ranged from college kids to 40-something sound nerds. Most of those kids were packed in front of their new jazz heroes barely able to contain their enthusiasm, swirling into a mosh pit of bodies and crowd surfers during the second half of the performance. 

The set began with saxophonist Leland Whitty softly blowing on his horn while touring keyboardist James Hill tickled the ivories and Chester Hansen laid down a steady bass line following his drummer, Alex Sowinski’s lead. The remarkable aspect of BADBADNOTGOOD isn’t their musical chops, it’s the mature approach these former university-mates take to music. What twenty year-old has the type of reverence for jazz, electronica and hip-hop to turn a composition from a fun tune into a piece of concert art that leaves even the most jaded music fan with their mouth agape, awed at the precociousness of BBNG’s songs? After watching two days of live music performances at Austin City Limits Music Festival we can confirm it’s few and far between. 

The hour and fifteen minute show included material from the band’s most recent record, IV. In fact, BBNG capped the show with a stunning take on the title track, setting off the young fans in front when the booming bass and electronic drums kicked in like a sonic explosion of euphoric release. This followed “CS60” perhaps the most ambitious track on 2014’s III. Separately each song is sublimely good. Strung together last night,  felt like a one-two jazz fusion knockout punch driving the Mohawk audience into the type of frenzy normally reserved for the typical dirty punk shows booked at the venue. 

If you’re attending ACL Festival tonight, make sure you head to the Tito’s Vodka Stage (tent) for BBNG at 6:15 p.m. this evening. We guarantee you’ll be glad you took in the performance before heading off to the Honda Stage for Gorillaz. You’re going to Gorillaz right?!

Next week the 16th edition of Austin City Limits Music Festival (October 6-8 and 13-15) kicks off with a new slate of headliners. Jay-Z, Solange, The Red Hot Chili Peppers and The Killers will all make appearances at Austin’s Zilker Park amid a cacophony of  exciting acts listed in the middle of the bill. While it’s a no-brainer to catch top hip-hop artist Jay-Z on the opening night of the festival, there are plenty of homegrown acts and buzz bands you should add to your schedule. It’s the bands scheduled earlier in the day and on peripheral stages that offer a chance at real music discovery. With nearly 200 acts slated to perform, finding new bands to fall in love with should be a priority for true music fans. 

Yes, like everyone else we want to know if Beyonce will make an appearance. After all, her husband, Jay-Z and sister, Solange are both playing the festival. It is probable the current queen of pop will be there. Will she appear on stage? That is the big question festival ticket holders are asking. There’s so much more to the event which will feature Austin-bred acts Spoon, The Black Angels, Lukas Nelson, Mobley and The Wild Now at the festival this year. 

Find a break-down the first weekend of the festival listed by day and learn which acts still have Late Night Show tickets available below. Our focus is on Austin bands because these local artists make some of the best independent music in the country along with a few bands that should be on your radar we think you’ll like. 

Included in the list of recommendations are links to official Austin City Limits Music Festival Late Night Shows. Grab tickets to those performances for a less crowded, headliner version of each artist’s festival set. 

Friday, October 6

The Wild Now – Miller Lite Stage – 11:45 a.m.

The Wild Now, an Austin duo comprised of vocalist, Taylor Baker and guitarist, Drew Walker make their first ACL Fest appearance first thing on Friday. While listening to Baker sing beautiful pop melodies along with Walker’s impressively intricate guitar work you’ll notice the couple is also easy on the eyes. Not a bad way to kick of the festival in our humble opinion.

If you’re one of those folks who set up camp chairs when the gates open, posting up at Miller Lite for the day might be a good way to go. Besides catching these up and comers, the Barton Springs Beer Hall is adjacent to the Miller Lite stage. Willie Nelson’s son Lukas and his band play later in the day before petulant indie songwriter, Ryan Adams. 

Lukas Nelson and the Promise of the Real – Miller Lite Stage – 5:15 p.m.

How good is Lukas Nelson and POTR? They were Neil Young’s backing band on his 2014 tour and album. Nelson is the Willie Nelson offspring most like his father in terms of musical ability. That doesn’t mean he’s the next outlaw country star. The guitarist likes to play Americana-tinged rock with abandon, often leaping into to the air with his axe. After ten years of POTR he knows how to entertain an audience. He’s also got decent pipes like his iconic father. 

You’re going to thank us for this recommendation later, especially after you learn his ACL Festival Late Night Show at Antone’s  Nightclub on October 11 already sold-out. 

Bonobo – Tito’s Vodka Stage – 6:15 p.m.

After watching Lukas hype up the crowd, you’ll be ready to get your dance on with DJ Bonobo doing a full live set at the Tito’s Vodka Stage. While we’ve seen Bonobo perform solo, we’re excited about the cutting edge DJ’s full band performance. Bonobo’s given name is Simon Green. Green got noticed with his second album “Dial M for Monkey” (2002) becoming one of the “new downtempo pioneers” in the process. We’re curious how the live arrangement will play in a sundowner festival setting. Betting it’s going to be a crowd pleaser. 

Fans have a second chance to catch this London-born, LA-based DJ at Emo’s on October 7 with Jeremy Sole during his ACL Fest Late Night Show.

Saturday, October 7

Mobley – Miller Lite Stage – 11:30 a.m.

Since we love Austin acts so much, pop singer Mobley should be the first artist you should see on the second day of ACL Festival. This singer might the be hardest-working solo act in town. The man wrote, produced and played every instrument on his debut album, “Fresh Lies.” The singer defies categorization, drawing a number of styles to create his music. After committing to music full-time his career has begun to take off as evidenced by his first ACL Festival slot and non-stop touring with Phantogram, JUNGLE, Mute Math (also on the festival bill) and Robert Delong. He’s an entertaining performer who should jolt you awake Saturday morning if you’re struggling after partying on opening day. 

Mobley performs with BADBADNOTGOOD on October 7. Get tickets here

Car Seat Headrest – Honda Stage – 2 p.m.

We first caught Pitchfork Magazine darlings Car Seat Headrest at SXSW a couple years ago. While we were impressed with the young Will Toledo (he was 23 at the time) at the helm of his solo act-turned full band, it wasn’t until CSH’s appearance later that year at Primavera Sound Festival that we were drawn into the cult of Car Seat Headrest like their huge online following and corresponding writers at Pitchfork, Rolling Stone and Paste Magazine. At only 25 years-old, Toledo and his band have years of great music ahead of them. 

Car Seat Headrest sold-out their ACL Festival Late Night Show on October 12 at The Mohawk if that tells you anything about the band’s popularity.

The Black Angels – Barton Springs Stage – 5 p.m. 

If you’re a fan of psych-rock then you cannot miss neo-psych pioneers, The Black Angels on Saturday. The Austin band that reinvented psychedelic rock for the new millennium is one our favorite local acts. The DIY group has their own music festival, LEVITATION (formerly Austin Psych Fest) and their own unique style of psych-rock that features guitarist Christian Bland’s sublime work along with Alex Maas’ heavily distorted vocals. Drummer Stephanie Bailey might be the area’s most underrated percussionist. 

Take a listen to their latest, “Death Song”  released earlier this year. It may be The Black Angels’ best effort yet. We recommend grabbing tickets to their Emo’s Late Night Show on Thursday, October 5 for full visual effects by TBA visual expert, Bob Mustacio. Psych rock pioneer Roky Erickson opens. 

Ice Cube – American Express Stage – 6 p.m.

No one could have predicted whenIce Cube broke into music with the debut of N.W.A in 1986 with Dr. Dre and Easy E, the rapper would become a staple in major films like “Boyz in tha Hood” and “Friday” to this year’s movie “Fist Fight” but there he is appearing on screens everywhere.

Less often O’Shea Jackson performs as Ice Cube, after leaving West Coast gangsta rap pioneers, N.W.A. in 1989, which is what makes this set intriguing, particularly amid less established performers like Chance the Rapper and red-hot duo Run the Jewels. In three short years, Ice Cube was on his way to becoming an icon of American culture which makes him relevant despite his waning musical output. His first three solo records were huge hits beginning with 1991’s controversial “AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted,” cementing Cube into the annals of great hip-hop artists. 

Spoon – Miller Lite Stage – 7 p.m.

We love that C3 Presents booked two of our favorite Austin bands, the aforementioned Black Angels and hometown heroes, Spoon nearly back-to-back on Saturday. Spoon has played the festival before but gets a coveted evening slot on the Miller Stage this year on the heals of Matador Records release, “Hot Thoughts” and an ongoing world tour to promote the record. 

What is not to like about the kings of Austin indie rock led by Britt Daniel (vocals, guitar) and Jim Eno (drums)? The band has been putting out incredible albums for over 20 years culminating in a return to the label they started out on. Not only does the album signal a homecoming of sorts, it’s a great listen

Grab tickets to Spoon’s Late Night show on October 13 at Stubb’s while you still can. 

Sunday, October 8

Middle Kids – Miller Lite Stage – 1:15 p.m. 

Australian three-piece pop-garage rockers, Middle Kids impressed last March at SXSW where we saw the band play before Spoon’s Waterloo Records show. When we spotted this Sydney act on the bill we knew we had to see them again. Led by Guitarist/vocalist/songwriter Hannah Joy, Middle Kids represent a world-wide trend of female-led acts similar to Austin’s Moving Panoramas and A Giant Dog. 

Following SXSW, Rolling Stone named the group one of ten bands to watch, confirming their buzz act status. Catch Middle Kid’s Late Night Show at Antone’s on October 12 with Austin’s Summer Salt. Tickets are still available

BADBADNOTGOOD – Tito’s Vodka Stage – 6:15 p.m.

Besides having an unforgettable moniker, BADBADNOTGOOD presents unconventional, free-form jazz in a way that appeals to young and older fans alike. The trio that is now a foursome hails from the wintery confines of Toronto. BBNG’s collaborations with Wu-Tang’s Ghostface Killah and Kaytranada have thrust the group into the forefront of the modern jazz/hip-hop trend best reflected locally by Brownout’s occasional performances with Ghostface’s bandmate and ringleader, GZA. 

Their latest album IV is on regular rotation at our office for good reason, the album is refreshing, employs multiple styles (elements of kraut rock, & futuristic hip-hop are present).  It’s a really great listen. If you’d rather see the group headline their own performance versus seeing them during the day at ACL Fest, grab a ticket to their Mohawk show on October 7.  Austin act, Mobley opens the show.